Defining Community-Oriented Policing

 Collecting water to bring home to your family without fear of being attacked; going to the toilet during the night without fear of being raped; being assured of a safe upbringing for your children — all these examples relate to how people experience peace and security on a day-to-day basis. In many communities around the world, however, people do not have the privilege of such … Continue reading Defining Community-Oriented Policing

We Want You! Youth Recruitment in Post-Conflict Areas

According to the latest UN estimates of the world’s population, (as of 2020) 1.2 billion of the planet’s inhabitants were between 15 and 24 years of age, representing 1 in 6 people. By 2030, this number is projected to grow around 7 percent, amounting to 1.3 billion youths. The majority of this growth will occur in developing countries, and these youths in particular are in … Continue reading We Want You! Youth Recruitment in Post-Conflict Areas

Civil Security in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa: The Evolution of New Institutions in the Wake of Crisis

In this brief, we share our findings from the Swat Valley in Pakistan, where new forms of hybrid institutions are emerging in the wake of conflict as examples of how police and communities can work together to build trust and ensure lasting peace. Click here to read and download the policy brief. Continue reading Civil Security in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa: The Evolution of New Institutions in the Wake of Crisis

Closeness Versus Distance: Relational Aspects of Community Policing

Community policing is increasingly used as a strategy for bringing the police and public closer together. However, both close and distanced police-public relationships have advantages and disadvantages. Based on interviews with community-based organizations, NGOs, community members and police officers in urban and rural parts of Kenya, this policy brief analyses community policing through a relational lens, identifying the pros and cons of closeness versus distance … Continue reading Closeness Versus Distance: Relational Aspects of Community Policing

(In)visibility: Women and Community Policing in Northern Uganda

In Northern Uganda, women have special needs and expectations regarding successful policing that are not sufficiently considered in theory and practice, rendering them mostly invisible. It is time to take female perspectives into account by listening to women’s experiences and examining their everyday life (security) situations. Click here to read and download the policy brief. Continue reading (In)visibility: Women and Community Policing in Northern Uganda