Pushing on a String? An Argument for Civil Society-driven Community Policing as Alternative to Ministry-centric Approach in Conflict-affected States

Most international support for community policing focuses primarily if not exclusively on capacity building of the government, namely Ministries of Interior and police forces. For structural reasons, these organizations—in and of themselves—are often not the most appropriate partners to launch or sustain community-oriented policing initiatives, especially in the early phases of police reform. This paper, by A. Heather Coyne and Ingrid Nyborg, presents an alternative … Continue reading Pushing on a String? An Argument for Civil Society-driven Community Policing as Alternative to Ministry-centric Approach in Conflict-affected States

Striving for the Impossible? Policing and Territoriality in the Age of the War on Terror

This article asks how variations of state territorial control have influenced police missions in the recent past, and illustrate how recent police reforms were based on the structure of a ‘western’ type state with clearly identifiable formal state institutions enjoying autonomy, that strive for a form of territorial monopoly over violence. The article argues for moving beyond such assumptions by adopting scenarios based on how … Continue reading Striving for the Impossible? Policing and Territoriality in the Age of the War on Terror

Emerging Perspectives on Post-Conflict Police-Community Relations II

In this editorial, Ingrid Nyborg and Daniel Lohmann introduce a special issue of The Journal of Human Security which is dedicated to exploring community-oriented policing (COP) and police reform in a series of post-conflict contexts: Kosovo, Guatemala, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and Kenya. The papers in this special issue explore how police reform in volatile contexts has taken place, and whether a focus on COP approaches rather than … Continue reading Emerging Perspectives on Post-Conflict Police-Community Relations II

The Gendered Nature of Security in El Salvador: Challenges for Community-Oriented Policing

By Erika Julieta Rojas Ospina With the purge of the Military Forces and the creation of a new National Civilian Police (PNC) as mandated by the 1992 Peace Accords, El Salvador set the stage for the construction of a less state-oriented security approach. However, a failure to question issues of security and a lack of consideration of gender in the Peace negotiations and the Security … Continue reading The Gendered Nature of Security in El Salvador: Challenges for Community-Oriented Policing

From Guns to Roses: Understanding Community-Oriented Policing in Afghanistan

By Ingrid Nyborg, Jaishankar Ganapathy and Ajmal Nimruzi. In Afghanistan, police reform is an important focus of international efforts. After over a decade of assistance, however, there are still daunting challenges of public trust and police effectiveness. From a civilian perspective, the role of the police is a crucial one—and very different from that of the military. Communities, being at the very heart of security … Continue reading From Guns to Roses: Understanding Community-Oriented Policing in Afghanistan